Analyze Structure, Language, and Theme: “Hope” (2024)

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ELA 2019 G7:M3:U1:L9

ELA 2019 G7:M3:U1:L8 Analyze Structure, Language, and Theme: “Calling Dreams” End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyze Structure, Language, and Theme: “I Shall Return” (Lessons 10-11) ELA 2019 G7:M3:U1:L10

In this Lesson

  • Daily Learning Targets
  • Ongoing Assessment
  • Agenda
  • In Advance
  • Technology and Multimedia
  • Supporting English Language Learners
  • Vocabulary
  • Materials from Previous Lessons
  • New Materials
  • Assessment
  • Opening
  • Work Time
  • Homework

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  • ELA 2019 Grade 7
  • ELA 2019 G7:M3
  • ELA 2019 G7:M3:U1
  • ELA 2019 G7:M3:U1:L9

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Focus Standards:These are the standards the instruction addresses.

  • RL.7.2, RL.7.4, RL.7.5, SL.7.1, L.7.5

Supporting Standards:These are the standards that are incidental—no direct instruction in this lesson, but practice of these standards occurs as a result of addressing the focus standards.

  • RL.7.1, W.7.5

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Daily Learning Targets

  • I can analyze how the structure of "Hope" contributes to its meaning. (RL.7.4, RL.7.5)
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in "Hope." (RL.7.4, L.7.5)
  • I can identify a theme and explain how it is developed over the course of "Hope." (RL.7.2)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Opening A: Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 9 (W.7.5)
  • Work Time A: Analyze Poetry: "Hope" note-catcher (RL.7.2, RL.7.4, RL.7.5, L.7.5)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engage the Learner - W.7.5 (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Read and Analyze "Hope" - RL.7.2, RL.7.4, RL.7.5 (30 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Discussion Norms - SL.7.1 (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Synthesis Questions: "Hope": In preparation for the end of unit assessment, students complete Homework: Synthesis Questions: "Hope."

B. Independent Research Reading: Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Then they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

Alignment to Assessment Standards and Purpose of Lesson

  • W.7.5 – Opening A: On an entrance ticket, students record feedback on a peer’s paragraph from the previous lesson, making specific suggestions about how their peer can more deeply interpret the structure, figurative language, or theme development of “Calling Dreams.”
  • RL.7.2 – Work Time A: Students read and analyze the poem “Hope,” examining the theme and how it is developed by structure and figurative language.
  • RL.7.4 – Work Time A: Students analyze the figurative language in the poem “Hope.”
  • RL.7.5 – Work Time A: Students analyze the poem “Hope” to determine how structure contributes to the meaning.
  • SL.7.1 – Closing and Assessment A: Students use new Conversation Cues to engage in a collaborative discussion about “Hope” and their learning about poetry so far.
  • In this lesson, students focus on becoming effective learners by collaborating with their peers to analyze poetry.
  • The Think-Pair-Share protocol is used in this lesson. Protocols are an important feature of our curriculum because they are one of the best ways to engage students in discussion, inquiry, critical thinking, and sophisticated communication. A protocol consists of agreed-upon, detailed guidelines for reading, recording, discussing, or reporting that ensure equal participation and accountability in learning.
  • This lesson is the first that includes built-out instruction for the use of Goal 4 Conversation Cues. These cues help students think with others to expand the conversation. Refer to the Online Resources for the complete set of cues. Examples of the cues used in this module include the following:
    • To prompt students to compare:

“How is what _____ said the same as/different from what _____ said?”

    • To prompt students to agree, disagree, and explain why:

“Do you agree or disagree with what your classmate said? Why?”

    • To prompt students to add on to classmates’ comments:

“Who can add on to what your classmate said?”

    • To prompt students to explain:

“Who can explain why your classmate came up with that response?”

Opportunities to Extend Learning

  • Release more responsibility more quickly to students as they comprehend the tasks or concepts. For example:
    • Allow students to create their own note-catcher, as this is a skill they will need for high school, college, and even in careers. Challenge students to read the learning targets and then determine how they would take notes about how poems develop meaning (themes) through figurative language and structure.
    • Allow students who are identifying the gists of the stanzas and other elements quickly the opportunity to identify figurative language in the text and share out examples during Work Time A.
    • Encourage students who show greater facility with poetry analysis to share with the class their note-catchers, especially the examples of elements that develop the theme that they identified.
    • Invite students who show a greater facility with reading poetry aloud to highlight the poem “Hope” so it can be read aloud with different voices: sometimes one voice, sometimes two, sometimes groups, and sometimes the whole class. Substitute the choral reading for this highlighted reading.

How It Builds on Previous Work

  • In previous lessons, students have focused on analyzing poetry together as a class. In this lesson, students continue that work in groups or partnerships and then independently to continue to develop their skills and increase their independence in preparing for the end of unit assessment.

Support All Students

  • Group together those students who may have difficulty understanding the poem, and offer more readings for comprehension, as well as support finding the gist or basic meaning of the words. ▲
  • Students may need additional support identifying and interpreting figurative language. Remind students of the work they did in the first half of the unit, interpreting language that was made to stand in for or convey another idea. Guide small groups or partners who are struggling to identify and analyze this language. ▲
  • The subject matter in this poem includes mention of how the intended readers are “frail children dethroned by a hue,” a figurative reference to black people who are mistreated because of the color of their skin. Continue to monitor students to determine if issues surface from the content of this poem that need to be discussed as a whole group, in smaller groups, or individually. To support students in processing this content, ask: “What habit of character did you use as you read and discussed this poem?” Students may need to draw on perseverance, empathy, and compassion as they read and discuss this content, being sensitive to their own and others’ reactions to the information presented.

Assessment Guidance

  • Review students’ Analyze Poetry: “Hope” note-catchers to ensure that students understand how the author structures the text and uses figurative language to develop themes.

Down the Road

  • In the next lesson, students will continue analyzing poetry, independently reading and interpreting “I Shall Return” by Claude McKay for the end of unit assessment as well as collaboratively analyzing works of visual art.

In Advance

  • Ensure there is a copy of Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 9 at each student's workspace.
  • Post the learning targets and applicable anchor charts (see Materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

  • Continue to use the technology tools recommended throughout previous modules to create anchor charts to share with families; to record students as they participate in discussions and protocols to review with students later and to share with families; and for students to listen to and annotate text, record ideas on note-catchers, and word-process writing.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 7.I.A.1, 7.I.B.5, 7.I.B.6, 7.I.B.8, 7.I.C.10, 7.I.C.12, and 7.II.A.1.

Important Points in the Lesson Itself

  • To support ELLs, this lesson provides teacher-led and peer-collaborative analysis of the structure, language, and themes in the poem "Hope" by Georgia Douglas Johnson. While analyzing poetry may be challenging, additional support throughout the lesson will help ELLs successfully participate in the analysis.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to conduct more pair and independent analysis of the poem. While this gradual release is important to prepare students for their end of unit assessment, it can be challenging. For peer-collaborative activities, use multilevel triads to support and challenge all students. For independent analysis, ensure that students understand the tasks and grapple with independent work as long as they can before receiving additional support.

Vocabulary

  • frail, dethroned, hue, omnipotent (A)

Key

(A): Academic Vocabulary

(DS): Domain-Specific Vocabulary

Materials from Previous Lessons

Teacher

Student

  • Techniques anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Work Time B)
  • Academic word wall (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Work Time A)
  • Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart (one for display; from Module 3, Unit 1,Lesson 3, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (one for display; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 13, Closing and Assessment A)
  • One Last Word by Nikki Grimes (text; one per student; from Module 3, Unit 1, Lesson 1, Closing and Assessment A)
  • Vocabulary log (one per student; from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2, Opening A)
  • Independent reading journal (one per student; begun in Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 6, Work Time B)

New Materials

Teacher

Student

  • Analyze Poetry: "Hope" note-catcher (example for teacher reference)
  • Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (example for teacher reference)
  • Homework: Synthesis Questions: "Hope" (example for teacher reference) (see Homework Resources)
  • Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 9 (one per student)
  • Analyze Poetry: "Hope" note-catcher (one per student)
  • Homework: Synthesis Questions: "Hope" (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 6-8 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize students' understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

OpeningLevels of Support

A. Engage the Learner - W.7.5 (5 minutes)

  • Repeated routine: Students respond to questions on Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 9.
  • Once students have completed their entrance tickets, use a total participation technique to review responses, highlighting exemplary specific feedback.
  • Repeated routine: Follow the same routine as with the previous lessons to review learning targets and the purpose of the lesson, reminding students of any learning targets that are similar or the same as in previous lessons.

For Lighter Support

  • Encourage students to create a checklist for a theme paragraph and share it with their partner and then the group. Record and refine student responses until students have a strong sense of what to give feedback about on Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 9.

For Heavier Support

  • Encourage students to discuss their feedback in pairs before writing it. As necessary, provide students with sentence frames to respond to Entrance Ticket: Unit 1, Lesson 9:
    • Your sentence(s) about structure / figurative language / theme were good because ...
    • Could you try (adding an example / explaining the example / telling how it develops theme) ...
  • Sentence frames decrease anxiety and increase comprehension and confidence.

Work Time

Work TimeLevels of Support

A. Read and Analyze “Hope” – RL.7.2, RL.7.4, RL.7.5 (30 minutes)

  • Review appropriate learning target relevant to the work to be completed in this section of the lesson:

“I can analyze how the structure of ‘Hope’ contributes to its meaning.”

“I can determine the meaning of figurative language in ‘Hope.’”

“I can identify a theme and explain how it is developed over the course of ‘Hope.’”

  • Inform students that, as in the previous lesson, they will read and analyze a poem, using the Techniques anchor chart and Analyze Poetry: “Hope” note-catcher to support them. In this lesson, they will work in pairs or small groups to analyze the poem “Hope” by Georgia Douglas Johnson.
  • Ask students to retrieve their copies of One Last Word and turn to page 56 of “Hope.”
  • Read the poem aloud, asking students to close their eyes and listen. Read the poem aloud a second time, asking students to follow along. Finally, read the poem aloud chorally as a class.
  • Note that students may not know what all the words in the poem mean, but they can note structures of the poem and get a general gist of the poem even before they understand all the words. Invite students to briefly Turn and Talk to a partner about their first impressions of the poem, including the gist, what they notice, and what they wonder.
  • Focus students’ attention on the first line of the poem and Think-Pair-Share:

“Who is the speaker? To whom is she speaking?” (The speaker is not named. The speaker is speaking to the “frail children of sorrow.”) Ask students to use context and background knowledge to determine the meaning of the word frail (weak or sickly).

“How can we use parts of words to understand the meaning of dethroned in this line? What does it mean to be ‘dethroned by a hue’?” (The word dethroned breaks down into de and throne, so it must mean to be “taken off a throne.” The word hue means “color,” so the phrase must mean “taken off a throne because of a color.”)

  • If necessary, provide the meaning of the word hue (a particular color).

“Why do you think the speaker calls them ‘children of sorrow’?” (The speaker may call them “children of sorrow” because they’ve been treated poorly because of their color.)

  • If necessary, ask:

“Why have the children been ‘dethroned’? To what does the speaker refer when she says ‘hue’ or color? Color of what?” (They have been dethroned because of the color of their skin.)

  • Add frail, dethroned, and hue to the academic word wall with translations in home languages where appropriate, and invite students to add the words to their vocabulary logs.
  • Confirm for students that the rest of the poem should be read with the understanding that the speaker is addressing the children that the speaker mentions in the first line, who have been treated poorly simply because of the color of their skin (because they are black Americans).
  • Ask students to Turn and Talk about what they notice about the poem’s structure:

“How is the poem organized? How does the structure compare to the structure of ‘Calling Dreams’? What do you notice about the punctuation of stanzas?” (This poem also has rhyming couplets and is organized in stanzas—three instead of two. The first two stanzas end in periods, while the third stanza ends in an exclamation point.)

  • Tell students that as they did with “Calling Dreams,” they should determine the gist of the couplets, then analyze the gist of each stanza. Note that this poem has rhyming couplets to show how smaller ideas are related. Each stanza also contains a bigger complete thought. Explain to students that in looking for meaning in poems, it is often helpful to find those areas where poems have repeating ideas or structures, and that is what they will do to begin their analysis of this poem.
  • Use a total participation technique to determine the gist of each couplet with the class. Record the responses on the board:
    • 1st couplet: mistreated children, there is still hope in darkness
    • 2nd couplet: no difficulty can last forever
    • 3rd couplet: the oak takes a long time to grow, but nettles and weeds grow quickly
    • 4th couplet: wait calmly and you can rise at the right time
    • 5th couplet: time moves according to a plan
    • 6th couplet: we are connected to the past, and everyone has a time to shine
  • Distribute copies of the Analyze Poetry: "Hope" note-catchers and ask students to form small groups. Assign each group a stanza to analyze and discuss.
  • Ask students to work in their groups to find the gist of each stanza. (Since there are likely more groups than stanzas, several groups will find the gist of the same stanza.) Determine the meaning of unknown words using strategies such as context, word parts, and a dictionary.
  • Tell students that they should note “1st stanza, 2nd stanza, and 3rd stanza” in their gists box and record the gists after they share out.
  • Ask students to share out the gists they identify for each stanza. Because there are likely several groups analyzing each stanza, invite volunteers from each group to add to or correct the gist that other groups share. See the Analyze Poetry: “Hope” note-catcher (example for teacher reference) to guide student discussion.
  • After a few minutes, ask volunteers from each group to share their responses about the meaning of the last line in each stanza.
    • 1st stanza: “No night is omnipotent, there must be day!” means that night can’t last forever or overpower day. Ask students to explain the meaning of the word omnipotent (all powerful).
    • 2nd stanza: “And rise with the hour for which you were made” means that the speaker is encouraging her listeners to rise and achieve their dreams.
    • 3rd stanza: “And each has his hour — to dwell in the sun!” means that everyone has a chance to shine.
  • Ask students to Think-Group-Share:

“What do the last lines of these stanzas have in common? How do the final lines help to convey the ideas of the stanzas?” (The last lines of the stanzas all express hope of some kind. They help to convey the idea that even if things are difficult, eventually they will get better.)

“How do the stanzas in the poem relate to each other? For example, do they discuss different ideas, develop similar ideas, tell a story, etc.?” (The stanzas in the poem discuss a similar idea in different ways. They all talk about how difficult times pass eventually, although they use different images. The first stanza talks about night passing into day, the second stanza discusses an oak growing from a seed into a tree, while the third stanza talks about the “cycle of seasons” passing so that “each has his hour.”)

  • Congratulate students on their work identifying the gists of each stanza and how they build on each other. Ask students to record these ideas on their note-catchers. Consult the Analyze Poetry: “Hope” note-catcher (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Ask if any student volunteers can identify a theme in the text. (Difficulties don’t last forever; no matter how difficult life is, there is always hope.) Have students record this theme on their note-catchers. Consult the Analyze Poetry: “Hope” note-catcher (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Tell students that to explore this theme more closely they will work together to analyze figurative language in the text.
  • Write the following examples, one from each stanza, on the board, and assign one to each group, based on the stanza they have been analyzing thus far:
    • Stanza 1: “Shadows are flecked by the rose sifting through”
    • Stanza 2: “Oak tarries long in the depths of the seed”
    • Stanza 3: “We move to the rhythm of ages long done”
  • Ask each group to discuss the meaning of the figurative language. Groups should discuss not only what the words mean, but the point they are making in relation to the theme they identified for the poem. Remind students that figurative language is often used to convey an abstract idea the author has about a subject in an interesting and vivid way. Students should consider what ideas these images convey.
  • After several minutes of analysis, ask groups to share out the meaning and purpose of their line of figurative language. Write the words “Meaning” and “Purpose” below the examples of figurative language to make the task clear. Because there are likely several groups analyzing each stanza, invite volunteers from each group to add to or reinterpret the analysis.
  • Stanza 1: “Shadows are flecked by the rose sifting through”
    • Meaning: Even shadows have other pretty colors like rose in them.
    • Purpose: to show that darkness still has hope in it, which means that even if you are going through a tough time there is still hope
  • Stanza 2: “The oak tarries long in the depths of the seed”
    • Meaning: The tree is a seed for a long time before it becomes a tree.
    • Purpose: to show that things in nature must be patient before they grow and become what they are meant to be, in the same way that people must also be patient before they can become who they are meant to be
  • Stanza 3: “We move to the rhythm of ages long done”
    • Meaning: We are affected by the long ago past.
    • Purpose: to show how things can take a long time to develop and change
  • Invite students to add these examples to their note-catchers in the Figurative Language section. Consult the Analyze Poetry: “Hope” note-catcher (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Inform students that they will now independently write a paragraph explaining how the poet uses structure and figurative language to develop a theme in “Hope.” Remind students that they have written similar paragraphs as a class and in pairs over the past few lessons. Direct students to write their paragraph on the lines on their note-catcher. As they do so, display the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart. Use a total participation technique so that students can share their responses. Record these on the anchor chart. For possible responses, see the Harlem Renaissance Themes anchor chart (example for teacher reference).
  • Repeated routine: Invite students to reflect on their progress toward the relevant learning targets.

For Lighter Support

  • In Work Time A, reinforce the poetry terms introduced in Lessons 7 and 8 by asking students to work in pairs to find examples from the poem “Hope” of each term on the Techniques anchor chart. Students can share these with the class and record them on the Techniques anchor chart next to each term. Reviewing the terms and applying them in a new context will ensure students have a thorough grasp of them.

For Heavier Support

  • In Work Time A, encourage comprehension of the poem by allowing students several minutes to highlight key words (such as unfamiliar vocabulary and also familiar words—possibly using different colors for known and unknown words). Students can also illustrate the poem in the margins or on sticky notes.
  • Also, encourage students to use a blank copy of the Analyze Poetry note-catcher from Lesson 7, which is a generic note-catcher that students can use throughout this unit. This resource supports student writing and comprehension with sentence frames.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingLevels of Support

A. Discussion Norms - SL.7.1 (10 minutes)

  • Remind students of their work generating discussion norms as a class in Unit 1. Refer students to the Discussion Norms anchor chart and ask students to Think-Pair-Share to generate questions they can ask to expand the conversation by comparing ideas, agreeing/disagreeing with ideas, adding onto ideas, or explaining ideas. (How is ___ different from what ___ said? Do you agree or disagree with what ___ said? Why? Who can add on to what ___ said? Who can explain what ___ said?) Add student responses to the Discussion Norms anchor chart under the "Cues" column.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share on responses they could make to these new questions or cues. ("_____ said _____. That's different from what _____ said because _____."; "I agree/disagree because _____."; "I think what they said is _____ because _____."; "I think what they are saying is _____.") Add student responses to the Discussion Norms anchor chart under the "Responses" column. Refer to Discussion Norms anchor chart (example for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Share with students any of the Conversation Cues listed on the example anchor chart that they have not yet arrived at as a group, and inform students that these cues can be used to help one another ask for more information from peers.
  • Tell students that they will have a chance to practice these cues today as well as the ones they identified in Module 1 as they engage in a whole class discussion about how the author develops the theme in the poem "Hope." Remind students of the work they did completing the theme section of the note-catcher at the end of the previous lesson, as well as the paragraph they wrote for the previous lesson's homework. Encourage students to use similar questions in guiding their class discussion of how the author develops the theme in the text:
    • What is the subject of the poem?
    • What is the theme of the poem?
    • How is the poem structured? How does this structure contribute to the meaning of the poem and the development of its theme?
    • What are some examples of figurative language the author uses in the poem? How do these examples contribute to the meaning of the poem and develop its theme?
  • Ask one volunteer to begin the whole class discussion on themes in the poem "Hope" with a question or a statement.
  • Invite students to reflect on the habits of character focus in this lesson, discussing what went well and what could be improved next time.

For Lighter Support

  • In the discussion, encourage students to draw on evidence from the Analyze Poetry note-catcher , but challenge students to not read their notes but rather practice the conversation cues and natural discussion language structures.

For Heavier Support

  • In the discussion, encourage students to use the sentence frames from their theme paragraphs on the Analyze Poetry note-catcher from Lesson 7 because their theme paragraphs address the same prompts as the discussion. Inform students that they will use similar sentence structures to independently write a theme paragraph in their end of unit assessment. Facility with the sentence frames will help them succeed in the discussion and on the assessment.

Homework

Homework

A. Synthesis Questions: "Hope"

  • In preparation for the end of unit assessment, students complete Homework: Synthesis Questions: "Hope."

B. Independent Research Reading

  • Students read for at least 20 minutes in their independent research reading text. Next, they select a prompt and write a response in their independent reading journal.

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Analyze Structure, Language, and Theme: “Hope” (2024)

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